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White Bumps In Throat Page 40 of 89

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Stoner,
You are going places I've already been, and I'm not going back. You'll be able to find the information in the history here. I don't have time for the repostings. I would rather go some place new.

And just as another observation... I would appreciate it if you would cite your sources when posting information as fact. TY in advance.
 
justmebyanyname last decade
i have just found out that i have some scar tissue that was left behind that could be due to the ringing in my ear and also doctors only want to give you antibiotics now a days they only want to medicate you and not deal withy what is going on and also they may have to take my adenoids out to but anyway if anyone haveing their tonsils removed let them check your adenoids out to just in case. and be sure to finish all of your meds they give you after surgery and especially take your pain meds. to
 
tonsils gone last decade
Hey all!!

I just wanted to let you guys know that Ive been lurking on this board for quite some time and have also received information from other resources... that being said, I am on DAY TWO of recovery from my tonsillectomy. WHAT A PIECE OF CAKE!!

Yeah, my throat is sore, yes I have that nasty yellow healing gunk where my tonsils USED to be... but guess what?? I NEVER KNEW MY THROAT WAS THAT BIG!! WOO HOOOOOO!!!

Wait, let me back track (and please understand that Im still on meds).. ive had those nasty stones for years, Im 37 years old, have a snoring problem and also have bouts with sinisitis (sp??) Otherwise, Im in terrific health and when I met with my ENT last week, I simply said 'listen, I know I cant do anything about my sinus problem, and the stones are driving me nuts... but I definitely want the tonsils out.'

He not only agreed, he set me up in less than a week (I had them removed 8am Tuesday morning)... anyways, I feel great!!! I dont know why everyone is so frightened of this surgery... WE AS ADULTS ARE NOT EVEN SUPPOSED TO HAVE TONSILS!! THEY WERE SUPPOSED TO SHRINK AWAY!!

But mine were too big, and had toooo many crypts.... therefore... THEY'RE OUTAA HERE!!!

Woo Hoooooo!!!!!!!!!!!! Sorry for all the excitement... I will definitely post in a few days after Im more healed. I really cant believe how wide open my throat is now, those damn tonsils took up most of my throat!! NO WONDER I WAS SNORING!!! And even though my throat is sore, Ive slept better the last two nights than I have in a LOOOONG time.

AND, even if those nasty things find a way to come back... I KNOW that I knocked out their primary source for attack... and therefore, was meant to have them, BUT i hope they dont. And like i said, i think that having all that SKIN outta the back of my throat is AWESOME!! I FEEL AWESOME!!! WOO HOOOO!!!!!!!!!!

Sorry, but IM SO EXCITED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
ilovemyENT last decade
Wow! I'll have what you're having!!

Congrats and i hope you continue to have an easy recovery! It must be like a heavy weight off your shoulders to have the problem solved! Keep us posted on your recovery ok?
 
whatastoner last decade
The following is one of the best posts i've seen on here about tonsil stones. It was originally posted by 'amberandmatt' on Nov. 26th, 2005. It's from the bottom of page 19. I KNEW i had seen somewhere on here the composition of those stinky little critters!!


Re: White Bumps In Throat From amberandmatt on 2005-11-26
I too had this problem. i did a search on the net and this is what dr. green had to say about it. hope it helps :)

The tonsils are sentinels, standing guard at the back of the throat to protect the delicate tissues of our lungs and intestines from foreign invaders. They are part of a ring of defenders, Waldeyer's Ring (which includes the tonsils, adenoids, and other lymphoid tissue), encircling the back of the throat as an important line of defense. The tonsils and adenoids are largest during childhood; they are front-line guardians while the body's more sophisticated internal immune system learns and develops.

The situation you describe, Alice, is a very common one. The tonsils usually appear like small, dimpled golf balls set on either side of the back of the throat. Children with large tonsils and deep crypts often do get food particles trapped in there. Because saliva contains digestive enzymes, trapped food begins to break down. Particularly, the starch or carbohydrate part of the food melts away, leaving firmer, harder remains of food in the tonsils. This does not look like the food that went into the mouth.

As you suspect, however, there is more to these hard lumps than just food. The tonsils also trap other mouth debris such as bacteria and old cells from the surface of the mouth's lining. Some of these cells contain small amounts of keratin, the same substance found in fingernails and rhinoceros horns. Whatever the nature of the debris, it is then attacked by white blood cells. The aftermath of this battle leaves the crevices of the tonsil strewn with hardened remains.

Most people swallow this material without ever noticing it, while it is still tiny. In those whose tonsils are large, however, the particles can lodge in the deep crypts, where they continue to grow. The enlarging lumps are called calculi of the tonsil, or tonsilloliths (tonsil stones). These stones are most common during adolescence.

Microscopic studies of these tonsilloliths have shown them to contain a combination of food particles, bacteria, oral debris, and white blood cells in a concentrically laminated pattern -- rather like a pearl. Usually they are small gritty particles found in the center of soft, cheesy flecks. Sometimes, however, they become quite large, appearing as rough, yellow or gray, round stones. At times they reach an extraordinary size. Affected people usually have a history of repeated attacks of tonsillitis in earlier years.

Most people with calculi of the tonsils have no associated symptoms. In that case nothing need be done, except perhaps for brushing or scraping them out, as your daughter does. Gargling, refraining from eating during the 30 minutes before falling asleep, and careful oral hygiene may help minimize their formation.

For some people, however, the calculi can be quite bothersome, causing a constant foreign-body sensation, a chronic low-grade sore throat, recurrent episodes of tonsillitis persisting beyond childhood, or chronic bad breath.

Treatment consists of either removing the tonsils or removing the calculi. Troublesome large calculi that are not easily dislodged may need an ear, nose, and throat doctor to remove them.

Not too long ago, tonsils were routinely removed for the sole crime of being swollen and inflamed. We didn't understand, then, that the tonsils purposely accept the infections to prevent the organisms from traveling deeper, and to show the invaders to the developing immune system to train it for the future. The tonsils are selfless protectors. As a child becomes an adult, the tonsils usually begin to shrink; the watchful guardians of childhood are no longer much-needed.

Tonsils are a bit like parents: looming large early in life, diminishing over time, ever-protecting, ever-teaching, but sometimes with rough or hard spots when we let things build up ;^)
 
whatastoner last decade
What you may not realize about that information that you can read at the original site...
http://www.drgreene.org/body.cfm?id=21&action=detail&ref=568...

is that it was posted by Alan Greene MD FAAP June 12, 1996 and reviewed by him and Khanh-Van Le-Bucklin MD September 2001. A LOT has happened since then. I don't think that can be considered the most reliable information at this point.
 
justmebyanyname last decade
Dr. Greene hasn't updated with any new info on the subject, so, when it comes to the composition of tonsil stones i doubt a thing has changed in what they think tonsil stones are made up of.

However, there's an interesting article there about the connection between children being misdiagnosed with ADHD, when really what may be making them act up is sleep apnea or sleep disturbances caused by....yep, you guessed it, enlarged tonsils and adenoids. It's an interesting article, and if i had a child with enlarged tonsils or adenoids, i'd seriously consider getting them out. Especially if the child was acting up due to sleep deprivation. Looks like the article is from Tuesday.


Tonsil Removal and ADHD: Connected?
By: Karen Barrow

Can a fairly routine problem, enlarged tonsils, be causing attention deficit disorder (ADHD) in your child? Not quite, says a new study, but tonsil problems may be partially to blame for some of your child's behavior problems.
While the cause-and-effect relationship is not entirely understood, researchers from the University of Michigan suspect that there is a relationship between enlarged tonsils and sleep-related breathing problems. Taking the relationship one step further, they also suspect that sleep problems may underlie some cases of behavioral problems in children, including ADHD.

'An undiagnosed sleep disorder is not the solution for all children with ADHD. But it could be something worth looking into for a substantial minority,' said Dr. Ronald Chervin, study author and director of the University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Center.

Chervin and his colleagues assessed 105 children, 78 of whom were scheduled for a routine tonsil and adenoid removal. Tonsils and adenoids are in the back of the throat, and if infected or enlarged, they may affect one's ability to breathe at night. In fact, most of the children in the study who were having their tonsils removed had also been diagnosed with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea, a sleep problem caused by frequent awakenings at night because of trouble breathing.

After evaluating the cognitive and behavioral abilities of all children, the researchers determined that 22 of the children scheduled for a tonsil and adenoid removal also had ADHD, while only two children from the 27 not scheduled for the surgery had this behavioral problem.

A year later, the children who had their tonsils removed to treat sleep apnea showed a significant improvement of their symptoms. Also, 11 of these children who were previously diagnosed with ADHD no longer met the criteria for diagnosis. The results of the study were published in Pediatrics.

'The findings help support the idea that sleep-disordered breathing is actually helping to cause behavioral problems in children,' said Chervin.

The reason why obstructive sleep apnea may affect a child's behavior is not at all clear. While poor rest and general grogginess may contribute to behavior problems, a few children in the study developed new ADHD a year after the surgery, suggesting that sleep-disordered breathing may cause damage that is not seen until years later.

The take home message of the study, according to the authors, is that children who snore or seem to have other difficulty breathing while they sleep, should see a doctor for treatment. If the child also has behavioral problems and those dissipate as a result of the treatment, so much the better.
 
whatastoner last decade
Well, I will agree that is an interesting study, but little to do with tonsil stones.

Not sure you have it right there in saying 'article there about the connection between children being misdiagnosed with ADHD'...I'd say the children probably did have ADHD, but rather this article is about a possible cause of ADHD. If I had, or a loved one had, ADHD this is very fresh information that would be of great information to me.

Funny how we all read different things and get something different from it. But like many things, *sigh* I can kinda make this tie into tonsil stones that are of great interest to me. ;) ready?

When looking up the cause of ADHD read...
'Scientists at NIMH and other research institutions are tracking clues to determine what might prevent nerve cells from forming the proper connections. Some of the factors they are studying include drug use during pregnancy, toxins, and genetics.' from http://www.healthyplace.com/communities/add/nimh/causes.htm

When looking up toxins read...
'Toxigenesis, or the ability to produce toxins, is an underlying mechanism by which many bacterial pathogens produce disease. At a chemical level, there are two types of bacterial toxins, lipopolysaccharides, which are associated with the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria, and proteins, which are released from bacterial cells and may act at tissue sites removed from the site of bacterial growth. The cell-associated lipoplysaccharide (LPS) toxins are referred to as endotoxins and the extracellular diffusible toxins are referred to as exotoxins.' from http://textbookofbacteriology.net/proteintoxins.html

So maybe its not the sleep disorder that couldnt be the explanation for all the ADHD kids, but the bacteria living in the tonsils producing the toxin that causes the nerve cells to act differently and also enlarging the tonsils enough to cause sleep apnea in some..... well...... you get my drift.

So maybe a future cure for ADHD will also be a tonsilectomy.....who knows? I just want to kill the bacteria... But if I had a kid with ADHD, I would probably get their tonsils looked at QUICK! And, I wouldn't settle for just a surface look...and if this really is caused by a bacteria living in the tonsils...the question still is why do some people have it and others don't? Which brings me back to the enviornment we all provide for the bacteria and the only thing in a bacterias life that we can change which is our pH.

Now it will all fit if everyone with tonsil stones has ADHD....uh......I don't think I do.... do you? Unless, tonsil stones are caused by different bacteria for different people. Then it could fit for some people. Now we need scientists to test the theories and we've solved ADHD cause.
...back to tonsil stones for me.


By the way.... I am testing alkaline. Anyone else testing themselves?
 
justmebyanyname last decade
By the way... wanted to know that this pH idea was not an original idea of mine...

In most of the informtion you find you find recommendations to go alkaline... this is a treatment for seizures...it goes extremely acid.
http://www.epipro.com/k_diet.html

'Advances in medications have since replaced the ketogenic diet as an initial form of treatment for epilepsy, but in recent years, interest in the diet has been renewed. It has a success rate of 50 percent, stopping seizures in 10 to 15 percent of cases and further reducing them in 30 to 40 percent of cases. Children who are seizure free stay on the diet two years, then return to a normal diet and typically never have another seizure again.' from http://www.memorialhermann.org/locations/CHNCepilepsy.html

Just interesting reading on the effect of your diet on your pH and that effect on your bodies proformance. There is a lot more information out there on this topic.
 
justmebyanyname last decade
Hey All!! On Day FOUR of tonsil surgery!!! Im feeling great, got caught up on a LOT of work at home, now Im just gonna veg through the weekend and look forward to going back to work (im getting a little bored).. anyways, here is an article that some of you may find very interesting... sorry about the format and spacing, that is how it copied....



Outlooks:

Tonsils and adenoids are composed of tissues that are
similar to the
lymph nodes or 'glands.'
Acute tonsillitis is an infection of the tonsils caused by
one of
several possible types of bacteria or viruses.
Chronic tonsillitis is a persistent infection of the
tonsils and can
cause tiny stone formation.
Peritonsillar abscess is a collection of pus behind the
tonsils.

Obstruction to breathing by enlarged tonsils and adenoids
may cause
snoring and disturbed sleep patterns.
Bacterial infections of the tonsils and adenoids are
treated with
appropriate antibiotics. Viral infections are not.
Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are indicated as follows:
(1) in
persons with repeated or persistent infections; (2) when
serious
complications of infection occur; and (3) when enlargement of
the
tonsils and adenoids causes breathing, swallowing, or dental
problems.



INTRODUCTION

The tonsils and adenoids are composed of tissues that are
similar to the
lymph nodes or 'glands' found in the neck or other
parts of the
body. Together, they are part of a ring of glandular tissue
(Waldeyer's
ring) encircling the back of the throat. The tonsils are the
two masses of
tissue on either side of the back of the throat. Normal tonsils
are
usually about the same size and have the same pink color as the
surrounding area. On their surfaces are little depressions,
called crypts,
which may appear deep and contain pus pockets or stones. The
adenoids are
located high in the throat behind the nose and soft palate (or
roof of the
mouth) and, unlike the tonsils, are not easily visible through
the mouth.
A tonsillectomy and an adenoidectomy (commonly referred to as a
T & A)
are surgical procedures performed to remove the tonsils and
adenoids,
respectively.

What is the purpose of the tonsils and adenoids?


The tonsils and adenoids are thought to assist the body in its
defense
against incoming bacteria and viruses by helping the body to
form
antibodies. However, this function may only be important during
the first
year of life. In fact, there is no evidence to support a
significant role
of the tonsils and adenoids in immunity. Medical studies have
shown that
children who must have their tonsils and adenoids removed
suffer no loss
whatsoever in their future immunity to disease. The popular
myth that they
act as filters to bacteria is untrue, not to mention
impossible.

What are common problems affecting the tonsils and
adenoids?

The most common problems occurring with the tonsils and
adenoids are
recurrent or chronic infections and significant enlargement
(hypertrophy).


ACUTE TONSILLITIS
Acute tonsillitis is an infection of the
tonsils caused by one of several possible types of bacteria or
viruses.
Acute tonsillitis is characterized by either the sudden or
gradual onset
of a sore throat which is usually associated with fever. The
patient may
stop swallowing saliva, start to drool, complain of ear pain
with
swallowing, and have bad breath. The surface of the tonsil may
be bright
red with or without a grayish-white coating (exudate). The
lymph nodes in
the neck may be swollen. Fever can be present.

Strep throat (tonsillitis) is a specific type of infection
caused by the
streptococcus bacteria. Strep tonsillitis can cause secondary
damage to
the heart valves (rheumatic fever) and kidneys
(glomerulonephritis). It
can also lead to a skin rash (scarlet fever), sinusitis,
pneumonia, and
ear infections. Acute mononucleosis is caused by the Epstein-
Barr virus,
and can lead to a very severe throat infection which is
characterized by
the rapid enlargement of the tonsils, adenoids, and lymph nodes
of the
neck.

CHRONIC TONSILLITIS
Chronic tonsillitis is a persistent
infection of the tonsils. Repeated infections may cause the
formation of
small pockets (crypts) in the tonsils which harbor bacteria.
Frequently,
small, foul smelling stones are found within these crypts.
These stones
(tonsilloliths) may contain high quantities of sulfa. When
crushed, they
give off the characteristic rotten egg smell which is well
known to cause
bad breath. They may also give a patient the sense of something
being
caught in the back of the throat.

PERITONSILLAR ABSCESS
A peritonsillar abscess is a collection
of pus behind the tonsils that pushes one of the tonsils toward
the uvula
(the prominent soft tissue dangling from the back of the upper
throat. It
is generally very painful and is associated with a decreased
ability to
open the mouth. If left untreated, the infection can spread
deep in the
neck causing life-threatening complications and airway
obstruction.

ENLARGEMENT OF (HYPERTROPHIC) TONSILS AND ADENOIDS
Obstruction to breathing by enlarged tonsils and adenoids may
cause snoring and
disturbed sleep patterns that may lead to sleep pauses or sleep
apnea.
Other features include frequent awakening from sleep, restless
sleep,
nightmares, bed wetting, mood changes, excessive sleepiness,
failure to
thrive, and even heart problems. Some orthodontists believe
that chronic
mouth breathing from large tonsils and adenoids causes improper
alignment
of the teeth (malocclusion). Chronic enlargement and infection
of the
adenoids may lead to infection of the air passages around the
nose
(sinusitis) or nasal drainage/obstruction, and/or may affect the
eustachian tube of the ear, leading to chronic ear infections.


How are diseases of the tonsils and adenoids
treated?

Bacterial infections of the tonsils and adenoids are treated
with
various antibiotics. Tonsillitis caused by the streptococcus
bacteria can
lead to serious complications, and must be treated. Oftentimes,
the
diagnosis of strep throat is confirmed by a throat culture or
rapid-strep
tests in the doctors office. Once treatment begins, it is
important to
take the full course of antibiotics as prescribed because the
premature
discontinuance of therapy can lead to adverse consequences and
regrowth of
the bacteria. Surgical removal is considered in those
situations resistant
to medical therapy.

Viral causes of tonsillitis are often treated with only
supportive care
(hydration and control of fever), and antibiotics are often
withheld.
Antibiotics are not effective for viral infection of the
tonsils.

An abscess of the tonsil (peritonsillar abscess) should be
drained
either by removal of fluid with a needle and syringe (needle
aspiration),
cutting open with a scalpel (incision), or tonsillectomy.
Chronic stones
in the tonsil can be removed with a clean finger or with a
blunt probe.
Massive enlargement of the tonsils and adenoids causing airway
obstruction
may be treated with a long course of antibiotics, or even a
brief course
of steroids (cortisone related medications, such as prednisone
and
prednisolone).

When should the tonsils and/or adenoids be removed?


Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are indicated in persons with
repeated
or persistent infections, particularly if they interfere with
everyday
activities. In general, repeated infections in children are
defined as 6-7
episodes in one year, or 4-5 episodes in each of two years, or
3 episodes
in each of three years. A significant episode of tonsillitis is
defined by
one or more of the following criteria: (1) a temperature
greater than 101
F; (2) enlarged or tender neck lymph nodes; (3) pus material
coating the
tonsils; or (4) a positive strep test. In adults, the severity,
frequency,
and hardship associated with repeated infections are considered
more
important than the absolute number. Chronic infections
characterized by
bad breath and/or tonsillar stones causing significant
disability are also
indicators for tonsillectomy.

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are strongly considered in
those
patients who are suffering, or may suffer serious complications
of
infection. These include peritonsillar abscess, history of
streptococcal
complications (rheumatic heart disease, glomerulonephritis), or
neck
abscess. Suspicion of malignancy or tumor is a definite reason
for
surgery.

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are also warranted in
situations where
there is enlargement of the tonsils and adenoids to such an
extent that it
causes severe sleep problems (snoring & breath holding),
sleep apnea,
dental abnormalities, and difficulty swallowing. Adenoid
enlargement
alone, or in combination with tonsillar enlargement, can cause
nasal
obstruction, recurrent ear infections, or sinusitis. If these
conditions
are resistant to medical therapy, surgery is indicated.

In should be emphasized that all decisions for or against
surgery are
dependent upon the individual patient's particular situation.
Additional
factors, such as tolerance of antibiotics, concurrent medical
problems,
school achievement/progress, and family preferences are also
important in
the decision process.
 
ilovemyENT last decade
Hi everyone! i have to ask if anyone has ever had a similar experience with these tonsil stones. I have noticed these little balls in my tonsils for a few years, usually just one or two every once in awhile. I had a mild sore throat the last couple days so this morning, i was looking at my tonsils. I noticed a little puss ball on the tonsil, part of it was covered by the flap that covers the inside of the tonsil. I poked at it with a q-tip, and kind of moved aside the flap, and about 10 of those little things fell out! i was disgusted! but curious... so i pushed aside the flap and about 10 more fell out. I did this a couple more times, and think i cleaned the area out pretty well, but could still kind of see a few up them deep inside that flap.
This really grossed me out since they are hard to get at in there and there were so many of them. Does anyone have any ideas for getting at this area? poking at it and moving it around with the q-tip made my mouth pretty sore, so i don't think that is a good option. Do you think they will keep growing in there?
thanks everyone!
 
Basil last decade
So I'm going to be gross for a moment--I apologize in advance.

This morning I woke up with an infected belly button. (Yes, I know, gross...I guess I just haven't paid attention to cleaning in there, lol) Well, as I've been swabbing it out today to try and get the infection to go away, I noticed that there is a pus type substance in there, and it smells EXACTLY like tonsil stones. I guess I'm just sharing this to contribute to the theory that tonsil stones are made up (at least partially) of bacteria and dead skin cells...

Does that make sense?
 
blpsara last decade
blpsara - I'm convinced that the cause of the stones is bacterial. Any part of your body can get infected and that includes the part of your body that fights infection.

For years I had H pylori but I didn't know I had it until I ended up in hospital. The Docs said 'we don't think it's cancer' but they weren't quite sure what was making me so ill. Then I ended up in a Dept where the Consultant in charge went off sick with stress just after he'd muttered the word 'surgery' to me. A bright new consultant took over and he booked me in for this brand new test which meant I was the guinea pig for it in my town of 300K people.

The test involved radioactive liquid and... FRESH OJ! The results came back and I had the HP infection big style. Three lots of tablets later I was cured - after years and years of worsening illness.

Apparently by the time we reach age 70, approx 70% of the population have HP. As every hospital on the planet isn't full of 70 year olds sufering the same symptoms as I had then there's something different about me from other people who have HP and don't suffer the symptoms.

I worked out that a former girlfriend who had started an ulcer while very young must have given me the HP. I caught it again a couple of years ago (self test this time) and after more tablets I am free of it again now. But, HP is caught from other people.

The connection with stones? Well, it's posssible that a very large number of people have the bug that causes them - but only a lucky few (relatively), get the symptoms of stones.

Any evidence to support that claim? Well I don't think there's anyone on here that hasn't had temporary relief from stones while they were on antibiotics. Antibiotics reduce the stones - period.

Why doesn't one good dose of antibiotic get rid of stones permanently? Well the HP story is a good one. That bug need three lots of tablets to kill it as it's a clever bug that has an overcoat of ammonia. One tablet rips off the overcoat and the other two kick the crap out of it. If I had antibiotics for other things in the past then the symptoms I had for HP were reduced slightly while I was on them. It had 'mugged' the HP bug for a few weeks but not killed it. As my Doctor said - 'if you have HP you've got it until you take the triple therapy - period'.

Justme is on the the right thread. It may well be an anaerobic bacteria (of the type that doesn't need oxygen to thrive) and it may well have an 'overcoat' of some sort. Which would account for temporary relief while we are on tablets. I suspect that we fall into the category of people who are very susceptible to the bug - just as I am with HP.

Whatastoner... to save you time could you just put the page reference and date of any previous you wish to refer to? it's just that you have to read all your post to see if you've said something new. If you just referenced it then your posts would be a fraction of the size and so much qucker to read.

Namaste
 
albert22 last decade
I just wanted to say: I am really glad that I stumbled upon this site!

I used to have these so called tonsil stones when I was a kid, but I was too embarrassed to tell anyone. And, as somebody else here mentioned, I was convinced that they were part of my brain! I don't recall ever having seen holes in my tonsils back then, though I did have pretty large tonsils. But problem went away for a few years and I had pretty much forgotten about it.

I have always been a really healthy person (like freakishly healthy), but then, at the start of my senior year in high school, I was sick an awful lot for a few months and the dreaded things returned. It was then that I figured out where they were coming from. (It is almost always my left tonsil, which is huge and has a big hole in it. My right tonsil is practically non-existant.) I am really stubborn and so ignored the fact that I was sick, but when my friends started to harrass me about it I finally went to the doctor and found out that I had mono. I was convinced that my tonsil problem was a result of me being sick, that my immune system was just under some added pressure and that they would go away soon. This was 3 years ago and I am back to my normal healthy self. But they haven't gone away.

I am actually pretty impressed with myself because somehow I came up with the idea that they were bacteria, white blood cells, and food (something that I had believed for several years but didn't actually confirm until looking it up today.) Quite an improvement from my early brain theory..

Anyways, I only get these things every once in a while and it's not a major problem for me. My left tonsil is constantly feeling swolen and irritated and I wake up with a sore throat every few weeks. However, it's not anything severe. The symptoms aren't enough to persuade me that surgery is the right option for me. It's just a nuisance and makes me feel kind of yucky and tired sometimes.

I just wanted to tell my little tonsil stone story because I noticed other people had similar stories about mono, etc. and thought it might help us see some patterns here.

I have read some of the comments about change in diet - cutting out carbs and nuts and chocolate and things. I don't think that this has anything to do with my tonsil stones, but I want to give it a try. I am wondering where people came up with these particular foods and how I can go about figuring out what foods might affect me. I am a vegetarian (for about 6 years now, so that hasn't changed) and I guess I probably eat more carbs than I should. I am going to try a few things and I will leave an update if I notice any change.

Cheers.

ps- Just another thought, this may seem quite strange, but I used to always notice the tonsil stones at a certain time of day. They would always start scratching at my throat when I was watching television/ having a snack (which I did each day after getting home from soccer practice in the afternoon.) I haven't noticed any kind of pattern since high school, but then I don't really have such strictly routine days anymore.
 
Lozzer last decade
Also thought I would mention, I am practically a vegan. The only dairy I eat is in cheese and the occassional yogurt.

I just read a backpost where somebody mentioned that the left side of the throat seems to be the most common side for these problems.

In addition to all of this, I have some kind of jaw issue where the left side of my jaw is constantly clicking around, getting locked shut, etc. My orthodontist told me that this is because I bite down when I sleep, but I don't think that this is true. I read something on another site about how some orthodontists think swollen tonsils can cause jaw problems, etc.

I realize that I can probably go on forever here, so I am going to refrain from sharing any more of my little tidbits. I think it is obvious to all of us that, though there may be similarities between us, there are also a lot of differences. And I don't expect we're going to find the cure amongst ourselves.

Anyways, take care and good luck all of you.

-- Lozzer.
 
Lozzer last decade
lozzer,

that's interesting. i also have that problem with my jaw (it's called TMJ) since the age of 12 or so. i've never heard about the potential link between TMJ and swollen tonsils.
 
kmoeller last decade
response to blpsara yes your stomach and throat and tonsils work together and your sinus work together why do you think that they tell you not to eat anything before that surgery because you will be deathly sick afterwards which will complicate things and yes i had my spell with those smelly tonsil stones also because when i was a kid i hawked one up and then smelt it and it smelt pretty bad but never had anymore since then mine were big with abcess behind it which was interfering with my swallowing and my sleep and now it has regrown underneath where like scar tissue which will have to be removed again i am glad that there was one person happy with their tonsillectomy i just wish that i will soon be happy with mine maybe so i just hope that everyone who has a tonsillectomy gets plenty of rest and plenty of sleep after all that is when your body heals anyway so God Bless and have a good day.....
 
tonsils gone last decade
yes tmj can be liked to swollen tonsils and other things also because of their location but also teeth formation too so take a good look at teeth and other things before judgement is passed on tonsillectomy... this is in response to kmoeller ....
 
tonsils gone last decade
hey i love my ent who did your tonsillectomy.....
 
tonsils gone last decade
To Tosls Gone: My ENT is Dr. Daniel Landes in Charlottesville Va.

The medical facilities in this town are top notch (well, because of Uva of course) and the doctors here are outstanding.

Anyways, Im on Day 8 of my recovery and I went back to work three days ago. Im back at the gym and other than this minor sore throat (some advil cures that) I am well on my way.

Sleeping at night is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO much better!
 
ilovemyENT last decade
I'm so glad to find this site. I've had this problem for years and the only other person I know who had it was my grandmother. Surprisingly, she told me way back when it was from dubris collecting on the tonsil. My problem is a little different in that it resides deeper in my throat. I've been to 3 ENTs and had two surgeries to no avail - removal of a Thornwald cyst and removal of one tonsil. I can feel the swollen area with the back of the tongue, but in spite of being scoped dozens of times, the doctors can not see it. I was on antibiotics for weeks trying to destroy the bacteria - remedy was very temporary. I've tried the water pik (among other things), but can't reach it. I think it must be a 'flap' of tissue that collects dead cells and other debris. Like with most of you, the odor is terrible! One doctor descirbed it as worse than road kill! Any suggestions?
 
metoo last decade
i am soo happy for you i love my ent i wished that i could feel that way i wished that someone down here would see my problem and remove this scar tissue because it grows inside me and i want it gone let me ask you one thing is your throat much wider now and can you swallow you drainage alot better ....?
 
tonsils gone last decade
To Tonsils Gone:

It is Day 12 of my recovery and I am pretty much back to normal. I have noticed a few things since the removal:

1) I sleep better... longer without waking up every hour.

2) Post nasal drip is GONE.. Ive had it for years, this is just a blessed bonus!

3) No more coated tongue! For some reason, Ive had a whitish tongue and Ive had to brush it like crazy to make it appear regular... but now it is completely gone! Yet another bonus I did not expect.

4) I havent had a tonsil stone since my surgery... thank goodness... and I got them daily.
 
ilovemyENT last decade
Chalk me up as another person who joined after finding this forum. And, well, I have to admit I have a somewhat limited understanding of homeopathy. I've really enjoyed reading up on some of the ideas presented in the last 40 pages or so, and I can certainly say I know a lot more about my tonsils than I ever did before.

I think I'm going to take my ENT's advice and go for the surgery. My left tonsil has the usual variety super-sized crypts, but my right one...well, my ENT and I have a running joke that I could probably charge rent on my crypts. Seriously, I should see if that puppet from HBO needs work. Once, while trying to swallow some pills and deal with chaos at work at the same time, I got one of those capsule-sized ibuprofen stuck in one.

Alas, I work as a stage manager, and finding two whole -days- I can afford to be off my game is hard, let alone nearly two weeks. September is the earliest I can even begin thinking about it. So, based on the advice found on this forum I bought a waterpik (I drilled out the low pressure tip with a hobby drill, to gentle the thing.) some salt, and some alcohol free mouthwash.

Like a lot of folks, I was -disturbed- when I first managed to get the pik's wand thingy behind those little skin flaps that half-cover my tonsil. It was like a tonsil-stone convention, and for the love of -Pete- the -taste-. It took hours to get the taste out of my mouth, as my freshly irrigated cryptage kept oozing goo.

The left side was even scarier than the right, even though I had no discomfort/pain there. So yeah, I have to chime in as thinking irrigation is probably a danged good idea. I'm still having discomfort, but the smell factor has gone waaaay down.

So wow, yeah, THANK YOU folks, for sharing your experiences and opinions on the aggravating tonsil beasties.
 
tajnyj last decade
Hi All!

I am so glad you guys posted on here.

I got my first tonsil stone when I was 7 and swimming. I was always told it was just a piece of my sinus lining. Eeek! Lately my husband has been complaining of bad breath on my part. And I have great oral hygiene!

I've been getting more and more of these lately. I'm 27 and have TMJ as well.

I just got a Waterpik - does this help anyone else? And how do you remove them without gagging?

Rae
 
pipsersmom last decade
O my gosh i am so glad i found this sight! so so glad! as you can tell from my username i am so damn sick of these disgusting little things and the foul taste i have in my mouth 99% of the time, infact i cant remember the last time my mouth didnt taste bad so there you go. I am only 20 and i cant remember when I started noticing these things but they are truly repulsive. as i live in NZ all this stuff you guys talk about like the water piks and stuff arent available as far as i know. I just (10 mins ago) took someones suggestion and went and got a little syringe and managed to syringe like 8 of these things out of my left tonsil. The right one isnt inflamed and doesnt appear to have any, is that weird? I would be so grateful to anyone with any ideas on what i can get in NZ for this problem? i am so close to demanding i have my tonsils out, my left tonsil is so massive, it takes up about 1.4 of my throat and i cant even see the bottom of it.
i am desperate! feel free to email me...anyone? this is runing my life! i have to get up in the night and drink juice to rid my mouth of the foul taste! kendalldotfdotgreenatgmaildotcom
please!
 
sodamnsickofthis last decade

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